Peter Nicholls, “The Science in Science-Fiction”, 1982.

Peter Nicholls, “The Science in Science-Fiction”, 1982 was a book about what must be probable or possible science. Science fiction is futuristic, but science must be in the story. Peter Nicholls gives examples, such as “cyborgs”, “starships”, “extraterrestrials”, and others in science-fiction. The science must be probable or possible for the plot to work. Continue reading Peter Nicholls, “The Science in Science-Fiction”, 1982.

Jules Verne, "From the Earth to the Moon", 1865.

Jules Verne, “From the Earth to the Moon”, 1865 is an example of what defines the Sci-Fi genre.  Verne’s  science-fiction novels are essentially ‘travelogue”.   A  “travelogue” is a book about  places visited, and experiences encountered by a traveler.  Jules Verne (1828-1905) was a master of the extraordinary voyage in his travelogue science-fiction. Continue reading Jules Verne, "From the Earth to the Moon", 1865.

"Time’s 100 Best Fantasy Books of All Time".

“Time” magazine’s 100 best Fantasy novels of all time is a chronological listing.  “Arabian Nights” in the 9th century, is followed by Lewis Carroll (“Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland” and, “Through the Looking Glass”) and onward to the present day.  Any collection of Fantasy novels, contrasts with Science Fiction novels.  Lewis Carroll writing Fantasy novels gives … Continue reading "Time’s 100 Best Fantasy Books of All Time".

Edwin Abbott, Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, 1884.

A. Square was the pen-name Edwin Abbott used in 1884 when writing this mathematical fiction story. Mathematical fiction as a genre originated with Abbott’s “Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions” in 1884. In communities of highly analytical people, in computer science and mathematics this book is a classic . Mathematical fiction is rare in comparison … Continue reading Edwin Abbott, Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, 1884.